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A popular vacation destination is about to get much more expensive

by Staff
The Galápagos Islands are home to many animal species that exist nowhere else in the world.<p></div></div></div><div class=
The Galápagos Islands are home to many animal species that exist nowhere else in the world.

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This is how much you’ll have to pay to visit the Galápagos Islands

While local authorities have been charging a $100 USD entry fee for all visitors to the islands since 1998, Ecuador’s Ministry of Tourism announced that this number would rise to $200 for adults starting from August 1, 2024.

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According to the local tourism board, the increase has been prompted by the fact that record numbers of visitors since the pandemic have started taking a toll on the local environment. The islands are home to just 30,000 people but have been seeing nearly 300,000 visitors each year.

“It is our collective responsibility to protect and preserve this unparalleled ecosystem for future generations,” Ecuador’s Minister of Tourism Niels Olsen said in a statement. “The adjustment in the entry fee, the first in 26 years, is a necessary measure to ensure that tourism in the Galápagos remains sustainable and mutually beneficial to both the environment and our local communities.”

These are the other countries which are raising (or adding) their tourist taxes

While the $200 applies to most international adult arrivals, there are some exceptions that can make one eligible for a lower rate. Adult citizens of the countries that make up the South American treaty bloc Mercosur will pay a $100 fee while children from any country will also get a discounted rate that is currently set at $50. Children under the age of two will continue to get free access.

In recent years, multiple countries and destinations have either raised or introduced new taxes for visitors. Thailand recently started charging all international visitors between 150 and 300 baht (up to $9 USD) that are put toward a sustainability budget while the Italian city of Venice is running a test in which it charges those coming into the city during the most popular summer weekends five euros.

Places such as Bali, the Maldives and New Zealand have been charging international arrivals a fee for years while Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir hinted at plans to introduce something similar at the United Nations Climate Ambition Summit in 2023.

“Tourism has really grown exponentially in Iceland in the last decade and that obviously is not just creating effects on the climate,” Jakobsdóttir told a Bloomberg reporter. “Most of our guests visit our unspoiled nature and obviously that creates a pressure.”

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